Heritage Quay at Home: Discover it!

Our final theme in our series of Heritage Quay at Home activity packs is Discover it!

This theme is all about sharpening those research skills and playing detective.

Why not have a go at making a historic map featuring your home or school? Download our how-to guide to find out what to do

Something else you can do at home is look out for the pests that can damage archive collections.

Pests!

Download this sheet first, then the ones below to create your activity pack

The images of the pests can be downloaded here and the labels here

and answers here

Educational Resources

We also have a range of educational packs with videos, which you can find at the mylearning.org website.

Heritage Quay at Home: Draw it!

These activities are simple and straightforward to do, since we’ve all got pens and pencils lying around the house, but still offer a chance for kids to get their creative juices flowing. Click on the images to download.

Drawings of old fashioned Rubgy League kits from 1922

Rugby League colouring sheets. Parents can have a go at this one too as a bit of colouring in is a good stress-buster. These colouring sheets are inspired by our Rugby Football League collection – stick to the colours of your favourite team or if you fancy having a go at fashion design, think outside the box (or the lines).

Make a Victorian-style newspaper advert for a weird and wonderful invention to solve a modern-day problem.

Take a picture of your finished artwork to share on our social media with #HQatHome and tag us in @Heritage_Quay

Heritage Quay at Home: Build it!

As part of our series of Heritage Quay at Home activity packs today we’re looking at the theme of Build it!

These hands-on projects show you how to design and create your own buildings from materials that you probably already have at home.

These activities were originally inspired by an exhibition at Heritage Quay about local buildings but are just as relevant now. Click on the images to download the instructions.

Think like an Architect instructions. If you want the original text instead of an image please get in touch

Think like an Architect

Build your own Queensgate market with LEGO instructions

Build Queensgate Market Hall from LEGO

Create a Cardboard town instructions. If you want the original text instead of an image please get in touch

Create a Cardboard Town

Take a picture of your finished architectural masterpieces and share it with us on social media using #HQatHome and tag us in @Heritage_Quay.

HQ at Home: Education Package Launch

Logo, text  reads "Heritage Quay at Home"

Home schooling and teaching remotely under lockdown can be a challenge – as can keeping the kids entertained. So at Heritage Quay, we’re offering a free package of fun (but educational) activities for children to do at home or at school, as part of our Heritage Quay at Home initiative.  

We’re uploading a series of worksheets that children can do either on their own or with parents. The activities are inspired by our collections, and influenced by successful workshops and outreach projects previously held at Heritage Quay in partnership with schools. You might want to use them to supplement your lessons, or just for a bit of a change!

Some of these worksheets are targeted at specific key stages and cover a range of subjects, including English and History. They include creative writing challenges and building projects that give children the chance to be architects (with Lego and cardboard rather than bricks and mortar, that is!). 

The activities are grouped under four themes and you can find out more and download the resources by clicking the links below.

Build it!

Tell it!

Draw it!

Discover it!

You can also follow us on our social media @Heritage_Quay and share your experience learning with us with the hashtag #HQatHome

Society for the Promotion of New Music

The Society for the Promotion of New Music (originally The Committee for the Promotion of New Music) was founded in London, 1943, by composer Francis Chargin, for the purpose of promoting the creation, performance and appreciation of new music by young and unestablished composers. The SPNM was a membership organisation which sought to find the best new composers and to help support their careers, especially in the UK. All schools, styles and nationalities (as long as the composer was a UK resident) were welcome. Composers would submit work to the SPNM and, if their work was found to be of merit, the young composer would have a chance to hear it performed in concert. The panel reviewing submissions were not looking for masterpieces and expected works to be rough and ready in part, allowing for the inexperience of the composer. What the SPNM’s reading panel were looking for was originality and potential. After the performance, constructive feedback was provided not only by professional musicians but audience members as well. If a composer’s work was judged to be of outstanding quality, then it would find its way onto the List of Recommended Works, meaning that it would be recommended for publication and performance outside of the SPNM.

Despite its charitable ambitions, the SPNM faced criticism throughout its history. The SPNM’s chief concern of providing self-help to composers meant that the music played at its concerts was not always popular with a general audience. The SPNM’s criteria for choosing its repertoire was also broad and inconsistent. Although older and more established composers’ work still counted as ‘new music’, if the composer was ‘unrecognised’, some felt that there was a bias in favour of younger composers. Nevertheless, the SPNM’s significance should not be undermined by these criticisms. The organisation helped a number of contemporary classical composers gain recognition. Composers such as Harrison Birtwisle, Roger Smalley, and Peter Zinovieff benefitted from the SPNM’s support. According to The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6th edition), in its first 50 years, over ‘8,500 composers were represented in its concerts and over 9,000 scores were submitted to it’. In 2008, the SPNM merged with other organisations, including the British Music Information Centre, to form Sound and Music, ‘the national charity for new music in the UK’.

The SPNM’s archive at Heritage Quay contains records relating to the administration of the Society, including correspondence and papers, recordings, calls for work from composers, and programmes.

Have a look at our recent post on Arthur Arathoon Paul, whose fascinating story was unearthed during work on the SPNM archive.

Equality and diversity

This is new blog series from the team at Heritage Quay where we’re going to be sharing the practical steps we’re taking to make our collections, staff and services more diverse and accessible.

This is a long-term project that we have committed to working on, so please get in touch to tell us how we are doing. It’s important to us that we are open about what’s going on.

Those of you who keep an eye on the archives sector may have seen that the last ARA conference ended very acrimoniously. This emphasised for us that it isn’t enough to say that we believe in equality and diversity in archives, we need to take concrete action to make changes.

We’ve started by drawing up a plan for the areas we think we need to work in. This gives us some ways of planning our activities and focusing our efforts.

To begin, we’ve identified some quick things we can do to lay the groundwork. This includes reading up on what other people are doing well, putting together a list of resources available to use, and mapping networks to speak to in the next phase.

That phase will involve a lot of listening and talking with those more qualified and experienced than us.

We commit to sharing the outcomes of those conversations here, and making changes in what we do. This will be a long-term project, and we are bound to get some things wrong, but we are committed to learning, openness and humility as we go. We also want to be allies to people already doing work around injustices in the sector, and offering concrete support and help to them where we can.

Introducing the Sir Patrick Stewart Archive

This blog has been written by Samantha Ennis, Archive Assistant at Heritage Quay, about her role in assisting in the cataloguing of the Sir Patrick Stewart Archive.

Sir Patrick Stewart’s final year as the University of Huddersfield’s Chancellor was 2015, which was the same year I graduated from Huddersfield. Unfortunately, I did not meet Patrick at my graduation but I have since had the opportunity of handling many of his personal and professional items. I now work in the university archives and my latest project was to catalogue a large section of his career.

For those that only know him as the famous actor and Yorkshireman, or University Chancellor, researching his extensive career through handling his possessions can help researchers learn more about him.

By seeing and handling material, you feel a personal connection. Heritage Quay has many of his scripts from TV, film, theatre and radio. There are nine boxes containing scripts from the 1950s to the 2010s and many contain notations to assist him in the interpretation of performances or contain his doodles and other notes. Some also have notes and messages from directors and fellow actors on the rehearsal process or record seeing a production once in the performance phase.

Patrick, like many of us, has kept many mementos of his personal and professional life. There are a large number of play programmes in the collection. Some of these programmes are from Patrick’s school years at Mirfield Drama Federation pageant and Calder Valley Summer School. These programmes date from 1954 to 2012, from the UK to the USA charting his acting career. He acted in many plays on both sides of the Atlantic, although he is probably better known to younger audiences for his roles in Star Trek and X-Men.

The collection also contains collected press coverage of his life and career. One newspaper cutting that stood out to me was not really about Patrick but about his dog Blackie. Blackie was a rescue dog who joined Patrick on stage in The Royal Shakespeare Company’s production of The Two Gentlemen of Verona. It’s great that these little features of Sir Patrick’s life are reflected in the archives.

The section on Patrick’s professional papers includes numerous awards from the 1990s to the 2010s. Patrick also kept diaries and we hold sixteen of these from 1973 and 1975 to 1989 as well as a red notebook where he recorded his thoughts on plays he was in during his time in reparatory theatre in the 1960s.

We also hold photographs of Patrick from the 1970s to the 2010s. These photographs are both of his professional life but also contain a few personal photographs. Among all the professional papers there is also a section relating to his personal life. This part of the collection contains letters, postcards, certificates, scrapbooks and caricatures to name a few. It also contains material relating to his family members and his time as a pupil at Mirfield Modern School.

You too can handle these belongings by visiting Heritage Quay when we re-open. More on visiting the search room is available here: https://heritagequay.org/visit/

Every little helps

Like most heritage organisations Heritage Quay keeps a disaster kit in case of serious damage to the University’s heritage collections (eg. through flooding). We are very fortunate in that we have never had to use our disaster kit – other than in practices!

Last week Sarah was able to access the University’s closed campus and retrieve the personal protective equipment from the disaster kit and donate it to two frontline NHS workers known to members of the Heritage Quay team.

We were able to donate 500 gloves, 800 aprons, 11 full protective suits, about 40 masks, and a pair of goggles, as well as 6 packs of disinfectant wipes.

Photo showing 4 bags of personal protective equipment donated from the Heritage Quay disaster kit
Bags of personal protective equipment donated from the Heritage Quay disaster kit