Heritage Quay Teaching Resources

Heritage Quay has developed six educational films for teachers of KS1-3 students. They are based on our amazing collections and provide opportunities to explore history, the arts and music in inspiring ways. You can access the films on youtube, and download the free teachers packs using the links below. To find out more about what else we offer for schools please visit our Learn page

SPORT
This film serves as an introduction to the sport collections at Heritage Quay and highlights the history of Rugby League and the sport’s close links with the town of Huddersfield. The film and the accompanying education pack provide a focus for a local history study as set out in the KS2 national curriculum.

Education Pack 1 SportFINAL

THE ARTS
The Arts scene in Huddersfield is a major area of strength in the archives. This film gives an introduction to the development of British theatre and highlights items from the Lawrence Batley Theatre, Huddersfield Operatic and Dramatic Society, and Mikron Theatre collections.

Education Pack 2 The Arts FINAL

EDUCATION
This film gives an introduction to the history of the University of Huddersfield, highlighting the role of Frederick Schwann and the Ramsden family in its history. It provides a focus for KS2 local history study. Items shown in the film include commemorative china which marked the opening of the Ramsden building, and the bell which called students to their classes.

Education Pack 3.EducationFINAL

MUSIC
This film highlights the rich variety contained within the music collections at Heritage Quay. From brass bands to dance bands, contemporary music to classical, this is an accessible introduction to a range of musical genres for those studying music at primary level.

Education Pack Music 4FINAL

INDUSTRY
The film gives an overview of Huddersfield’s development as a textile town, highlighting the links between textiles and manufacturing, and focusing on local engineers Hopkinsons, whose archive is one of the largest and most complete at Heritage Quay. The film is a valuable starting point for a KS2 local history study, as well as supporting the KS3 themes of industry, empire and technological change. The Fabrics of India sample books shown in the film may inspire and interest textile students.

Education Pack 5. Industry FINAL

POLITICS
This film introduces the collections of three significant figures which are prominent in the archives – Robert Blatchford, Victor Grayson and John Henry Whitley. The film gives a brief outline of their achievements in bringing about social and industrial improvements for working people and invites the viewer to consider their legacies. The film is intended for a primary audience, however it provides a good starting point for KS3 students studying British politics between 1860 and 1939.

Education Pack Politics 6 FINAL

Key Collections Series: Education

 

Education has been central to the development of Huddersfield for nearly two hundred years. The archive of the University of Huddersfield reflects both an historical interest in giving the working classes a good education, and the philanthropy of local businessmen and land owners, who supported the reading rooms of the mid-19th century. These were the catalyst for the Huddersfield Mechanics’ Institute and the Huddersfield Female Educational Institute, both of which initially taught basic skills to local people on a subscription basis.

 

Plan of main Huddersfield Mechanics Institute Building, opened in 1861
Plan of main Huddersfield Mechanics Institute Building, opened in 1861
Image of Huddersfield Technical School, opened 7 July 1883
Image of Huddersfield Technical School, opened 7 July 1883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Educational trends then moved toward vocational education, and the institution evolved into the Huddersfield Technical College, which offered day classes to younger students and evening classes to those employed on a full-time basis. Other educational collections include Holly Bank (Technical) Teacher Training College, which focused on producing a new generation of skilled vocational teachers. The records of the West Yorkshire College of Health, the National Adult School Union and the Open College Network are also held in the archive.

 

Education. Polytechnic Charter

 

 

 

 

 

Huddersfield Polytechnic charter, 1972

 

The collections also reflect some areas of research and inter-disciplinary studies (Canter Environmental Psychology; Cullingford and Booth printed collections; Buck Architectural archive).

 

Catalogued Collections: Education

Albert Booth Photographic Library – http://heritagequay.org/archives/BOO/

David Canter Environmental Psychology Library – http://heritagequay.org/archives/DCB/

University of Huddersfield Archive (ongoing) – http://heritagequay.org/archives/HUD/

 

Uncatalogued collections: Education

Andrew Buck Archive – http://heritagequay.org/archives/?keyword=buck%2C+andrew

David Canter Archive –

http://heritagequay.org/archives/?keyword=canter%2C+david+archive

Library of Cedric Cullingford – http://heritagequay.org/archives/?keyword=cedric+cullingford

Open College Network – http://heritagequay.org/archives/?keyword=open+college+network

 

Pursue your own research using the collections

Find out about our events exploring the collections- many free

The Big Draw

We’re celebrating the national Big Draw campaign this month at Heritage Quay with a brand new schools workshop!  This year’s campaign theme is Every Drawing Tells A Story and we’ll be investigating the life stories of two well known local figures – Victor Grayson (the Disappearing M.P.) and Susannah Sunderland (Yorkshire Queen of Song).  You don’t have to be able to draw to join in the artistic fun and there’ll be a chance to practice your research skills too!  The workshop is free, lasts around 3 hours, and can include a campus tour.  To find out more or book your place,  please drop an email to T.Wells@hud.ac.uk or ring 01484 473168.

“The female of the species” – Oastler College

ITV has recently celebrated its 60th anniversary with the series “Britain As Seen on ITV“.

The six shows celebrate 60 years of ITV footage, and look at how real life in Britain was portrayed through a wealth of ITV Studios owned material.

Episode five features female students at Huddersfield’s Oastler College, which merged with Holly Bank in 1974 and together formed the Polytechnic’s Faculty of Education – now the University of Hudderfield’s School of Education and Professional Development.

The Oastler students feature about 3 minutes into the programme (NB registration required with ITV website to view) https://www.itv.com/itvplayer/britain-as-seen-on-itv/series-1/episode-5-the-female-of-the-species

Autumn Term at Heritage Quay

With the new school term well under way, here at Heritage Quay we’re looking forward to welcoming lots of new faces onto our schools  programme for years 4 to 8, with workshops such as Find It! Draw It! Play It! and Build It!  All our workshops are linked to the History, Geography, Technology, English and Drama curriculae for key stages 2 and 3, are great fun and completely free!

The Archives at Heritage Quay will be celebrating The Big Draw during October with the launch of an arts based workshop, Draw It! which draws inspiration from two local historical figures, Victor Grayson, M.P. for Colne Valley in the early 20th century, and Susannah Sunderland, “Yorkshire Queen of Song”, the founder of the choral competition which will be familiar to many Huddersfield schools.

In November, Heritage Quay will be handing over control to students from Netherhall High School’s history club as they take over the archives on Friday 20 November, as part of the national Kids in Museums campaign. They’ll be undertaking some research of their own as well as taking on the roles and tasks of Archivists.

We’ve already got some role play experience under our belt through our theatre workshop Play It! which took place back in June.  This drama workshop takes the Rugby League collection at Heritage Quay as its starting point.  Supporting History and English curriculum objectives, Y6 children from Lindley Junior School re-told the story of the birth of Rugby League and its impact on local communities.  They were led through a range of dramatic techniques by professional actors from Chol Theatre along with Huddersfield University drama students.  The pupils and their teachers learned a lot about acting and rugby – they thoroughly enjoyed dressing up, handling artefacts from the collection – and wearing false moustaches!  Here they are posing at the end of their performance with the 1892 Yorkshire Senior Competition Shield.

Our schools workshops support National Curriculum objectives, last around 3 hours, can include a campus tour, and best of all, are completely FREE!

So if you would like your class to discover their inner thespian, architect, researcher or artist, drop an email to T.Wells@hud.ac.uk  or give her a ring on 01484 473 168.

We look forward to seeing you this term at Heritage Quay!

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Rugby League Drama Workshop 2015

News from the trenches…

If you’ve been a long time follower of the HQ blog, you may remember reading last year about our participation in an ‘enlisting station’ for a First World War schools day for Years 10-11 from the local area.  It was an opportunity for them to participate in interactive learning about aspects of the First World War, and our enlistment activity during the lunch break prompted them to consider questions about what role they might have taken if standing in front of enlistment station in 1914 (military service, home service or conscientious objector).

WWI triage 6 (2)
Students triage a student helper in need during the Injuries of war session.

We were involved for a second time this year, much more on the organisational side, but the archive took on the task of designing the wrap up session after lunch, which consisted of a fact based First World War quiz to test students existing knowledge and introduce them to new facts and figures  in a fun environment.   Due to changes in the National Curriculum we targeted the day at Year 9 students, many of whom were visiting the university for the first time.  Many of the students did well in the quiz, which came down to a high pressure head to head between a girls team and boys team from Yewlands Academy, nr Sheffield.  The tiebreaker question was correctly answered by the boys team, who went away with a stylish and highly collectible University of Huddersfield drawstring bag!  Colleagues from the History, English, Music, Health and Human Sciences, Chemistry and Creative Writing departments took part, making the event truly interdisciplinary.  You can read more about the event on the university news page.

WWI spiritualism 2 (3)
Students attended a workshop on the rise of Spiritualism as a result of the war

The event grew out of the University First World War Commemoration Network and its the second year it has successfully run.  With next year being the centennial anniversary of the Battle of the Somme, we hope to run the event again, making it a truly reflective and informative event for all those students attending.

Scholarship Exam #fridaychallenge

Could you gain a scholarship to the Huddersfield Technical College? The following scans are exam papers from 1893 enabling some students to gain scholarships in order to continue their education at the college. Despite a sea change in education over the last century, as an adult it’s interesting to note that potentially 14- and 15-year olds would be taking this kind of exam (some of which is pretty impossible for this blogger to answer)!

It’s also interesting to note the similarities and differences in the way subjects have been taught over time and the expectations of students. Whilst the Spelling, Algebra and French sections would be fairly familiar to the GCSE students of today, the Composition section shows essays were shorter in the 1890s, and Geography a lot more simplistic. ‘Parsing’ sentences in Grammar might be more familiar to A-Level or degree students in the 21st century. Trigonometry might be the first way to deal with triangles and theorums, and its unlikely most of the domestic economy questions would make it onto a modern syllabus. The vocational nature of the arithmetic is interesting too, with its focus on profit and commission. It goes someway to show how vital good mathematics was to sales and businessmen in the days before calculators did most of the work, when your livelihood depended on having the ability to calculate at your fingertips!

paper1  paper2 paperlast

How much of this paper can you answer? We’d love to know which bits you found easy, difficult or impossible, or your opinions on this kind of paper. Have you done your GCSEs or A-Levels recently? How does this paper compare to what you faced in some of your exams?

Roll up, roll up – enlisting here!

Yesterday the university ran a very successful Schools Conference looking at aspects of the First World War. Due to our current pre-occupation with ‘the move’ we weren’t able to get involved in running any sessions, but we did participate in organising a lunchtime ‘enlistment’ activity. Young people were given example propaganda and ‘encouraged’ to enlist. When they came down to our station, we gave them an individually researched ‘war story’ to add to their conference pack, and we took a straw poll as to whether if they had had to choose for real, they would have decided to enlist in the armed forces, home services or register as a conscientious objector. It was really interesting to answer some of their questions about the specifics of this choice, and whilst many decisions broadly followed gender lines (a few of our male attendees chose Armed Forces very quickly!) we had a great spread of responses. Of the 52 young people who participated, 28 would have chosen the Armed Forces, 17 Home Services and 7 probably would have registered as Conscientious Objectors. It might be intriguing if the conference does go ahead as anticipated again next year to survey the young people before and after, to get some idea of how the sessions in the conference are affecting their thinking.

We had a great lunchtime session anyway, and hope to participate more next year once the move is complete. We also got chance to get the word out to future potential Heritage Quay users through our new postcard marketing! Hopefully a great day was had by all!

enlist