What will you discover on the Archives Hub?

We’ve recently updated a lot of the catalogue information we contribute to the Archives Hub and the Archives Portal Europe.

As of right now (!) the Archives Hub contains information about 1,439,837 archive collections in 341 different repositories across the UK. 

The Archives Portal Europe currently contains information about 270,327,385 descriptive units of archives in 7,036 institutions across Europe.

Using portals like the Archives Hub is an effective way to discover unique and often little-known sources to support your research. New descriptions are added every week, often representing collections being made available for the first time. Use the portals to instantly scan the archival landscape and bring together diverse sources held in repositories across the continent.

Whether you are just starting out or are ready to explore your subject in depth, portals can help inform your work. They represent a huge diversity of content, from the archives of industries, institutions and researchers to the letters and manuscripts of writers and poets.

You can see all our descriptions and other information on the Archives Hub at https://archiveshub.jisc.ac.uk/search/locations/627a22c9-d85c-3c8a-bb43-6daed9e6aa00

Justice of the Peace and Local Government Review

Among the periodicals (or “serials”) held at Heritage Quay is “Justice of the Peace and Local Government Review” (originally “Justice of the Peace”). We hold 221 volumes, covering 1838-1959; the run includes supplement and index volumes.

The publication started in 1837, as a weekly summary of legal cases, with editorial comment, and later correspondence and short articles. Job advertisements for local government posts as well as commercial and charitable advertisements are included.

As well as local government public health, public assistance, rates and rating, highways, housing, town and country planning, licensing, landlord and tenant, and magisterial law and procedure, the periodical strikes me as a great source for social history in general.

The Rhthym Sisters

Collector Charles Hippisley-Cox writes
“Recent contact with the granddaughter of Kay Munro-Smythe has caused a flurry of interest in the pioneer 1930s jazz vocal group known as the Rhythm Sisters.   Most of their recordings are preserved here in the British Dance Band Collection in the Heritage Quay….including an iconic version of seasonal classic “Winter Wonderland” featuring Sam Browne and the Rhythm Sisters from 1935.”
Enjoy!

Collections week and Christmas closure, 24 December 2018 – 12 January 2019

Early January tends to be a quiet time in the research room, so the team will again take the opportunity to focus on some larger collections which are difficult to work on whilst normal activities are going on in Heritage Quay.

Collections need sorting, repackaging and cataloguing to be accessible for your research, and often a large amount of space and time is needed for this.

Heritage Quay will be closed from 16:00 on Sunday 23rd December 2018 and will re-open at 09:30 on Saturday 12th January 2019 to enable the team to undertake this work, following the University’s Christmas and New Year closure.

During January this year the team finished off the Hopkinsons’ Ltd archive and made a start on sorting and surveying Sir Patrick Stewart’s archive, received during 2017. We also undertook a vital stock-check during a closed period in July 2018, to make sure that archives are available for use.

Sally Jerome archive features in new exhibition

Visitors to Huddersfield Art Gallery this October (2018) can see a selection of Heritage Quay’s archival collections on display as part of a new exhibition called Look Twice

The centrepiece of the exhibition is a new work created by HOOT Creative Arts which was inspired by items from the Sally Jerome Archive, which is kept by Heritage Quay. Supported by the ROTOR team from the School of Art, Design and Architecture, participants from HOOT visited Heritage Quay to explore Sally’s portfolios, before making their own work using similar themes and techniques.

On show from Heritage Quays’ collections are some of the artworks that HOOT found most inspirational and archival documents which tell the story of Sally’s life.

The exhibition is on until 3 November. The Sally Jerome archive is available for all to view at Heritage Quay.

 

Trevor Wishart & Mick Banks’ Landscape – 2nd performance at Hebden Bridge Arts Festival, 1st July 2018

Local composer and researcher Julian Brooks attended the New Voices networking days at Heritage Quay in autumn 2017. As part of the days, the composers explored part of the British Music Collection and Julian was excited by the score for Trevor Wishart and Mick Banks’ ambitious site specific music composition “Landscape”, which was first staged in 1970.

This chance encounter with the score led to a recreation of the spectacular all day event around Hebden Bridge featuring fireworks, choirs on hillsides, flags, balloons, bells, improvising kids, cyclists playing their bikes and cones of black ice cream served from Royds ice cream vans playing Beethoven’s 7th Symphony.

Julian worked with Leeds-born Trevor himself, who is regarded, amongst many accolades, as the UK father of community music in this country. The event was supported by UK contemporary music charity Sound and Music, Arts Council England and Hebden Bridge Arts Festival.

Landscape is a series of somewhat surreal music-theatre situations which have been scored for pre-specified activities, outdoor locations, times and durations spanning twelve hours over one day.

Julian made use of Mick and Trevor’s guidance to incorporate workshops and performances from musicians, artists, local schools, community groups and small business introducing audiences to contemporary music that will appeal to new and experienced audiences alike.

Dr Julian Brooks said “I couldn’t believe it when I came across this amazing score in the archives of the BMC and I realised I had something very special and genuinely ground-breaking that needed to be performed. It brings out all that’s best about Hebden Bridge. Trevor Wishart is one of the most important composers of contemporary music in this country, his work is still hugely influential and this second-ever staging of Landscape will make audiences think, have fun and be entertained.”

Arts Festival Artistic Director Helen Meller said “For years people have been saying we should recreate Landscape as they remembered how spectacular it was from the first time round and then Julian came forward with the score and the skills to do it. It is a genuinely one off piece that is perfect for our festival as it is ambitious, challenging and playful. It’s been a real joy to see Trevor and Julian’s vision come together pulling in all sort of local people to take part, and I am looking to eating some locally made black ice cream from Royd’s Ice Cream as I watch the whole piece unfurl.”

Heritage Quay Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) project final evaluation report published

During 2012-2017 the University of Huddersfield archive service was transformed with just under £2million investment from the Heritage Lottery Fund and the University of Huddersfield. The project funded new premises in Heritage Quay, plus extensive engagement, participation and collections management programmes. The service has won a range of external awards during this period including the Times Higher Education Leadership & Management Award for libraries and the Guardian HE award for “buildings that inspire”, as well as obtaining Archive Service Accreditation.

The project evaluation report, which follows HLF’s latest guidance, has just been published at http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/34679/ and is now freely available to download.