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  • CRS/2/1/1

    Letter from Ted Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    1978
    Letter dated 8th of January 1978 from Ted Hughes, thanking Donald Crossley for his watercolours, describing his book with Faye Goodwin and telling Crossley his plans to be in West Yorkshire in February.
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  • CRS/2/1/2

    Letter from Ted Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    1985
    Letter, with envelope, dated 21st of January 1985 from Ted Hughes, thanking Donald Crosslet for a painting of Crimsworth Dene and apologizing for the lapse of letters after losing Crossley's address. Hughes informs Crossley of news of his fathers death at 85 as well as news of siblings and children before offering his cottage for holidays. Hughes ends the letter reminiscing about two childhood friends and memories he shared with them.
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  • CRS/2/1/3

    Letter from Ted Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    1985
    Letter dated 19th of October 1985 from Ted Hughes, addressed to Donald and Hilary Crossley and informing them of Hughes' intention to visit West Yorkshire. He mentions how nice it was to have the Crossley's in Devon - although apologizes for the weather, reiterating his offer for them to borrow it again. Hughes thanks Donald for a paining of 'the Tree', mentioning that it is admired by his 'painted friends', including R. Lloyd. Hughes informs the Crossley's of his inpending tour as the new Laureate - worrying about the preconceptions of the audience before admitting: 'sometimes, fortunately, I don't give a damn'. Hughes finished by mentioning his brother Gerald and his career change to being a full-time painter '-at 65'.
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  • CRS/2/1/4

    Letter from Ted Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    1986
    Letter dated 1st of December 1986 from Ted Hughes, addressed to Donald and Hilary Crossley and describing their meeting at Heptonstall Church, where Hughes attended a wedding. Hughes goes on to mention the meal they shared, although he has forgotten the name and gives some general directions instead. Hughes talks about somewatercolours Leonard Baskin is doing - mentioning his favourites, before asking if Donald did any paintings whie visiting in the summer and talking about the light in Devon.
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  • CRS/2/1/5

    Letter from Ted Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    1986
    Letter dated 19th of August 1986 from Ted Hughes, addressed to Donald Crossley, apologizing for his absence from an upcoming visit from Crossley, explaining he will be in Canada with his son Nicholas. Hughes goes on to talk about how busy his year has been and wishes that Crossley will catch an Indian summer.
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  • CRS/2/1/6

    Letter from Ted Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    1998
    Postcard dated 3rd of March 1998 from Ted Hughes, addressed to Donald Crossley thanking him for his letter and sending his congratulations to Crossley's daughter Ruth and her husband. Hughes then writes about Betty Lumb and a memory they shared which he doubts she remembers now - before finishing the letter by mentioning he has sold the farm.
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  • CRS/2/2

    Letters from Gerald Hughes to Donald Crossley with folder Series

    1994-2011
    A collection of letters from Gerald Hughes to Donald Crossley.
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  • CRS/2/2/1

    Letter from Gerald Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    1994
    Letter dated 1st of October 1994 from Gerald Hughes, addressed to Donald Crossley thanking him for his painting of Studley Pike, before talking about the lon cold winter they are experiencing in Australia and the grand final of the Aussie Rules Football tournament, between the West Coast Eagles and the Cats. Hughes expresses his sadness to hear about the deaths of Billy Rogers and David Farrars and mentions the loss of two other personal friends. Hughes closes the letter informing Crossley that he and his family are well and asking to be remembered to Collin. There is a postscript which describes an enclosed picture of 'Red Hill' - which is not with the letter.
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  • CRS/2/2/2

    Letter from Gerald Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    2001
    Letter dated 4th of April 2001 from Gerald Hughes, addressed to Donald Crossley thanking him for the 'splendid snaps' of spots around Banksfields, which Ted would have loved. Hughes goes on to write about Ted's death and the impact it had on him, before expressing his shock at Collin's death and thanking Crossley for assisting Hilda and asking him to keep an eye on her. Hughes then confesses he does not know the location of 'That Bilberried Bank' - suggesting it could be up Crimsworth Dene, which was a favourite spot of Tom and Walter's in the pre-war days. He writes that about three months before his death, Ted sent him around a dozen old photo's of their family - with Hughes mentioning he has seen the original one at Ted's home, so it could now possibly be in the posession of Freida or Nick with Hughes offering to ask them. He then writes about having his watercolours photocopied at the local library, which distorted the colours, so he has retained them for record purposes only. Hughes offers to send some to Crossley for his evaluation, before scoring himself and explaining that he feels his time in Africa has affected his vision, making him alergic to sunlight which inhibits his ability to translate in his painting. He ends the letter stating that he will write to Crossley again as they investigate the missing photo.
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  • CRS/2/2/3

    Letter from Gerald Hughes to Donald Crossley Item

    2002
    Letter dated 15th of April 2002 from Gerald Hughes, addressed to Donald Crossley apologizing for his delayed reply and thanking him for the pictures he had sent of Red Acre and the hills above Bankfields. Hughes talks about being in good health, before talking about the weather as they had just experienced the first real downpour in 6 months - mentioning that Perth is running out of drinking water and they are now tapping into the large artesian wells underground. He writes that the 17 year drought is making everyone aware of the value of good drinking water, noting that the time of watering gardens from the tap is passing - leading to the loss of rose gardens. Hughes mentions that the Aboriginals did not waste water but that they are making up for 50,000 years of conservation, recognising that the population is not accpeting the fragility of the country's ecosystem seriously. Hughes then writes about the settings of two poems - 'The Weasels We Smoked Out of The Bank' and 'The Ancient Briton Lay Under His Rock', before mentioning the poem 'Heptonstall' and explaining the reference to a relation who had been a circus strong man, relating it to a story of Ted and Sylvia visiting the relative.
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